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Andrew Arkley|January 20, 2014

How to write a Teacher’s CV

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Teaching is a fast paced but also a highly rewarding profession. People may joke about the long holidays but those holidays are well earned! Getting a teaching job requires the correct qualifications and level of experience, but also a good CV. A well written and presented CV is the surest way to get an interview with the Head Teacher. In many cases those with less experience but who have fantastic CVs have been invited to interviews compared to those with more experience and poorly written CVs.

A teaching CV won’t need to be too different in format to other CVs such as a chronological or experienced based CV, you can pick one of this forms to best display your experience and extra qualifications. A good teaching CV should display some of the following aspects:

  • Your main subject such as Music or Physics.
  • Your department / position at each school
  • A brief summary of the school such as what type of school it is, rough numbers of pupils and staff and mention any special units such a special needs etc.
  • Your role and a summary of your main responsibilities.
  • Extra-curricular activities such as clubs you ran or took part of or other schemes etc.

These sections should form the basic format of your previous teaching work if you have a few years and varied experience to display. If you are a Graduate Teacher you can always make use of your work experience in the same format, this is as valuable as any teaching job. Put any voluntary work you’ve done at schools, so long as you can relate your experience to the job you are applying for.

A teaching CV should have a brief personal statement detailing why you are looking for work as a Teacher, the reasons could be to gain new experience in a primary or secondary school. It is important to detail your passion and interests as a Teacher and then add a couple of sentences about why you are suitable for the job, examples could be your ability to adapt your teaching style to different children’s needs. The personal statement shouldn’t be more than 100-150 words; a paragraph is plenty to let the recruiter form an idea of who you are.

A key competencies section is always good to display your key skills; you could break your skills down into several sub sections such as ‘Teaching Skills,’ Professional Skills, ‘Personal Skills’. Each section you should detail your strengths without drawing attention to your weaknesses, these can be discussed at the interview stage and you can then always turn those into strengths.

A good teaching CV will also need to be paired with an exceptional cover letter, these two go hand in hand so it’s vital that you get both elements right. If you’re struggling to make your CV shine and you’re fed up of not getting your dream teaching job, PurpleCV has you covered. We offer a huge range of CV Writing Services, we also do cover letters so every angle is covered. Get in touch today to see what PurpleCV can do for you.

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